Professional Aviation Services at Air Cargo Africa 2017

Airfreight into Africa is one of the largest growing markets in the world.

air-cargo-africa-2017Recognising this, the Air Cargo Africa conference and exhibition, which brings together various role players in the industry to explore the potential of this market, is coming to Emperors Palace, Johannesburg from the 21 -23 of February.

 


Professional Aviation Services, specialists in Aviation Security and Air Cargo Security Compliance and Training, will be exhibiting at Air Cargo Africa. With a 35-year history in Aviation, and specialising in providing unique solutions that solve client’s challenges, Professional Aviation Services is ideally placed to service and assist clients in finding solutions for their various needs.

We are passionate about keeping Aviation safe and secure, for ultimately, it is all about protecting people. From the personnel who are involved in the Aviation Industry, the people who fly as crew and passengers to the public who could be affected by an aviation incident. By taking part in Air Cargo Africa, we intend to showcase the importance of keeping the growing Airfreight in Africa business safe and secure.

With the airfreight industry into Africa growing at the rate that it is, now is the time to equip your organisation to take advantage of the growth, and keep your staff and your organisation safe and secure. Our services can be combined into a unique solution for you that is customised to solve your unique challenges.

We at Professional are always willing to take up a challenge. So, if you require a service or solution that is not listed below, contact us and let us see how we can help you.


 

Services that we offer include the following:

 

Consulting and Risk Services

  • EU RA3 Validations for clients who operate in countries that are not listed on the EU Green list
  • Air Cargo Security Compliance Consulting – with 36 Regulated Agents in South Africa as our clients, we have a wide range of experience in guiding clients in terms of operating a secure supply chain
  • Aviation Security Consulting – our team of experts can assist with your general aviation security queries and provide solutions for your challenges.
  • Risk Services – we can assist with security tests, audits and once-off checks to evaluate the security of facilities and processes.

Training Services

  • IATA Training Courses – through our registered IATA Authorised Training Centre, (ZA-PRI-1-14-001; ZA-PRI-3-16-001), we offer IATA Dangerous Goods training, Introduction to Safety Management Systems, as well as Aviation Security Awareness and Cargo Security Awareness courses, through the International Cargo Training Programme and the International Aviation Training Programme.11.01 - 4

 

  • Classroom Training – as a SACAA Approved Part 109 Aviation Security Training Organisation (Approval number: SACAA/AVSEC/CS/008 and SACAA Approved Part 92 Dangerous Goods Aviation Training Organisation, (Approval number: SACAA/DG/0031) we offer quality classroom based training at various locations around South Africa. Our main training centre is situated in Jet Park, with 4 dedicated classrooms, with other locations at Lanseria International Airport, and Wonderboom Airport. We are also able to conduct training in other parts of South Africa, with two dedicated branches in the coastal areas, one in Durban and one in Cape Town.

 Our training team consists of 7 SACAA Accredited Aviation Security Training Instructors, 2 of which specialise in Level 1, 2 and 3 Aviation and  Cargo Security Training. Several of our instructors are also qualified to teach Dangerous Goods Awareness.

 Courses on offer include:

  • Aviation Security Screener Training for Passenger and Baggage and for Cargo, Store, Mail and Supplies. (Level 1)
  • Aviation Security Supervisor Training for Passenger and Baggage and for Cargo, Store, Mail and Supplies. (Level 2)
  • Aviation Security Management Training for Airports and Airlines, as well as for Cargo. (Level 3)
  • General Aviation Security Awareness Training (ASAT)
  • Aviation Security Awareness (Cargo, Store, Mail and Supplies) Training
  • RPAS Aviation Security Awareness Training (for Drone/RPAS/UAV operators)
  • Dangerous Goods by Air Regulations (Awareness) for Categories: 4,5,7,8,9,10,11,12

  • Customised Courses – our dedicated Research and Development team specialise in developing customised in-house courses for clients, as well as to meet general training needs that we identify in the market.

Current courses that are available include:

  • Human Factors for Personnel
  • Human Factors for Supervisors and Managers
  • Lithium Battery Awareness (both classroom and on-line)
  • Handling of Lithium Batteries
  • Enhanced Security Training
  • Driver Security – Anti-Hijacking Course
  • On-line Learning – through our on-line learning platform, proftrain.co.za, we offer customised e-learning courses to various clients, as well as general courses that are open to the public.
  • Learner Management System – struggling to manage the training function of your organisation? The Professional Learner Management System is a database system which simplifies the management of training for your staff.

Other Services

  • dgr-58th-en-regular icao_techinical_emergency_response_guidebook_2013IATA Publications – as one of only two registered IATA Publications Agents in South Africa, contact us for all your IATA publication’s needs. We take the pain out of ordering IATA products. Visit protrain.co.za/shop to see all the products on offer.

 

  • ICAO Publications – are you looking for ICAO Annexes and Technical Instructions and other ICAO publications? We are a registered ICAO Publications Reseller, contact us to place your order today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Dangerous Goods and Lithium Battery Awareness Seminars – educating staff and clients is a vital part of doing business safely and reducing potential incidents. The Professional Dangerous Goods and Lithium Battery Awareness Seminars help to educate your clients about the dangers of mis-declared, undeclared or hidden dangerous goods. It also educates them on the dangers of Lithium Batteries and what is allowed and not allowed. Contact us to book a seminar for your staff or your clients.

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For more details contact us on +27 11 397 1222, +27 11 701 3320 (24/7), email us at info@professional.za.com or visit our website, www.professional.za.com .

Drones: A South African security perspective

Drones, UAV’s, UAS, RPAS – whatever terminology that you may use, unmanned aerial vehicles are becoming more and more popular, not just for use by hobbyists who like to fly them on weekends, but for commercial purposes.

Using Drones for Commercial Use

 

Commercial use of drones ranges from aerial photography and filming, to being used in anti-poaching operations, aerial surveys, crop spraying, wildlife and other forms of monitoring, parcel delivery, delivering of medical supplies to remote areas, evaluation of fire scenes and incidents and surveillance.

Major retailers such as Amazon, are experimenting with drone technology for the fulfilment of orders in their larger warehouses, as well as looking at the viability of utilising drones to do deliveries. Large industrial plants are investigating the use of drones for spare parts logistics. Drones have been used to deliver blood and other essential medical supplies in hard-to-reach rural areas in countries like Rwanda.

Various organisations are testing using Drones to do deliveries.

Various organisations are testing the use of Drones to do deliveries.

Delivery options such as these, if they become a viable option for urban areas can increase the speed of deliveries, as well as saving resources and streamlining processes.

There are infinite applications, which are limited only by the technology that is currently available.

Negative uses of Drone Technology

 

Drone technology has many benefits when used in a positive manner. But like most technologies, there is a dark side to it as well. The most common “negative” use of drone technology that is prevalent, is the use of weaponised drones in warfare, as well as drones that have been used for espionage.

Criminals are also embracing drone technology. There have been reports of drones being used to smuggle items into prisons for the prisoners. In the UK, criminals have attached thermal imaging cameras onto drones in order to pick up the heat signatures of their rival’s marijuana farms, in order that they can steal from them. There are also what are known as “Narcotics drones”. These are drones that are used by drug dealers to smuggle drugs over the U.S./Mexican borders.

Closer to home, there is the potential for criminals to utilise drones to identify potential targets for robberies, both of commercial and private properties.

The word “Drone” has a negative connotation due to the use of weaponised drones that have been used in warfare by various countries, so the preferred name is the term RPAS – Remote Piloted Aircraft Systems. This definition encompasses the wide range of RPA systems that are available, from miniature units that can fit into the palm of your hand to larger fixed wing units with wingspans of more than 1m.

Risks involving RPAS

 

But with every technology, there is some element of risk that is involved. The military potential for destruction and the criminal element have already been highlighted, but the risks involving RPAS to the civilian user is just as high.

Injury to the Public

 

RPA’s can be very dangerous if not operated safely. Multi-rotor RPAS units have very sharp carbon fibre blades that can cause injury if they come into contact with a person. There has been a case in England where a toddler has lost an eye due to being injured by the blade of a RPA that was being flown in the backyard of the house.

Most RPA’s are powered by a rechargeable Lithium Polymer battery. As the recent Samsung Galaxy Note 7 incidents have illustrated, Lithium batteries can be very dangerous, if they are not manufactured or handled correctly. The Lithium Polymer batteries that are generally used in RPA’s are large and very powerful. If these batteries are not managed properly, they can be damaged and the damage to the battery can cause it to explode or ignite.

Besides the safety issues surrounding the RPA itself, other risks from the negligent operation of an RPA are the following:

Collision with other aircraft, with possible fatal results

 

There are frequent reports from around the world of pilots reporting RPA’s flying near their aircraft when coming into land. Besides the blatant disregard of the laws stating that RPA units should not fly within 10 km of an aerodrome, this is very dangerous. If the RPA had to strike the aircraft at a critical point while landing, and get caught up in an engine or wing flap, there could be disastrous consequences for the aircraft.

Other risks include damaging people’s property and legal liability for breaking laws such as privacy by-laws and other laws enforceable by other authorities.

Minimising the Risk

 

So, how can this be prevented? Firstly, by implementing specific legislation with regards to RPAS, and secondly by educating the public as to the risks and the rules regarding the use of RPAS.

South Africa is one of the first countries in the world that has introduced legislation with regards to the operation of Remote Piloted Aviation Systems (RPAS). With the rapid growth in the RPAS industry and the increased use of RPAS for commercial applications, legislation is necessary to ensure the safety and security of everyone who shares civil aviation airspace.

Part 101: Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems – the regulations that govern the operation of RPAS in South Africa became applicable in July 2015. These regulations cover the use of RPAS for commercial operations, corporate operations, non-profit operations and private operations.

Private Operations

 

With regards to operating RPAS in South Africa, if a person operates a RPAS unit for their own use, it may only be used for an individual’s personal and private purposes where there is no commercial outcome, interest or gain. The pilot must observe all statutory requirements relating to liability, privacy and any other laws enforceable by any other authorities. It is also a requirement that those that sell RPAS, display notices and inform buyers of the basic regulations as it applies to private and other uses of the systems that they sale

The flying of drones as a hobby has increased dramatically over the last number of years.

The flying of drones as a hobby has increased dramatically over the last number of years.

Commercial operations; corporate operations or non-profit operations

 

Drones or RPAS are often used for commercial filming e.g. movies, commercials.

Drones or RPAS are often used for commercial filming e.g. movies, commercials.

If an entity or a person is operating a RPAS for commercial operations; corporate operations or non-profit operations, the RPA must be registered and may only be operated in terms of Part 101 of the South African Civil Aviation Regulations.

 Aviation Security Awareness Training for RPAS 

 

Often the reason that individuals make mistakes or inadvertently break the rules, is that they are not aware of what the risks are or the potential threats. Therefore, one of the mandatory requirements is that all personnel employed in the deployment, handling, and storage of RPAS need to undergo Aviation Security Awareness Training, as detailed in Part 109 of the Civil Aviation Regulations.

Professional Aviation Services has been involved in the Aviation industry in one form or another for the last 35 years. We specialise in offering risk services in terms of compliance; aviation security consulting; training and aircraft sales.

We are passionate about educating and equipping people, and we are an approved Aviation Security Training Organisation. We offer the only SACAA approved Aviation Security Awareness training course designed specifically for RPAS operations. If you would like to find out more or book a training session, please contact us. Training is available at all our facilities. To find out more, please visit our training site, www.professionaltraining.co.za.

In Conclusion

In terms of mitigating risk and increasing security, education is key. The correct application of the regulations, the ongoing education of the public and the safe operation of RPAS, will go a long way in keeping the skies and people safe. This will create an environment where the use of RPAS technology to solve problems can become a reality.

Source information with regards to Part 101: South African Civil Aviation Authority.

Revised Regulations with regards to Aviation Security – what you need to know

UPDATE

The 14th Amendment to the Civil Aviation Regulations was published on the 28th October to be effective 30 days from date of publication, download the amendment here:

14th-amendment-to-the-civil-aviation-regulations-november-2016

The revisions to the Part 108, Part 109 and Part 110 Regulations and Technical Standards that have been in the works since 2012 passed the final benchmark on the 12th June 2015.

The Regulations will now go to the Minister for signature before becoming law and the Technical Standards will go to the Director of Civil Aviation for signature.


Here are some of the things that you need to know:

1. High Risk Cargo and the security measures relating to High Risk Cargo are clearly set out;

2. All Regulated Agents and Known Consignors to apply cyber security measures

3. Procedures for Transfer and Transit cargo set out;

4. Changes to Exempted Cargo, in particular that human remains are no longer exempt;

5. Regulated Agents no longer have to screen 10% of cargo from Known Consignors;

6. Known Consignors no longer function on the basis of a relationship with a Regulated Agent only, each Known Consignor now requires a Security Manual and is free to deal with any Regulated Agent;

7. Training for the personnel of Regulated Agents and Screeners is no longer under Part 108 all security training is now under Part 109;

8. Air Cargo Security Familiarisation Training as we knew it under Part 108 has been replaced by Aviation Security Awareness Training under Part 109 and the scope of people requiring training has been dramatically increased;

9. Screeners now require 10 days training plus 1 day X-Ray machine familiarisation training plus 10 days On The Job Training per screening method that they will use;

10. Screener Supervisors must be qualified Screeners before undergoing an additional 5 days of Supervisor training;

11. Security Managers, Designated Officials and Deputy Designated Officials require 5 days training.


 

These are some highlights, we are available if you need further details on any of the above and on the possible implications for your business.

The changes to Part 108 and security measures have long since been introduced into most security programs these should not cause any problems at all and should be welcomed as they are very good for cargo security.

Probably the most contentious issue from these Regulations will no doubt be the length of training for Screeners and Supervisors of Screeners. In the cargo world training required goes up dramatically.

We fully support these changes, remember that Screeners ensure your safety and the safety of all who fly, do you really want a poorly trained individual who has been given the minimum possible training screening the cargo under your seat?

We need to have world class training and certification, period. No debate, no if or buts, no excuses or debates about time and expense, this is a security issue not an economic debate.

Even the much vaunted TSA has challenges, they recently failed 97% of routine security tests.

We can do better.

Do you prefer the coalface?

The importance of risk management is, unfortunately, best understood only when disaster strikes.

Freight industry management executives were inevitably born, and raised, at the coalface of the business.  The art of management, including risk management, is more often than not learnt late in the career of a freight management executive.   The entrenchment of coalface experience, which often means fighting fires on a day to day basis rather than constructive forward planning, is difficult to shake off.   This mind set is encouraged by the attitude that “it will never happen to me”.

There are a number of examples of failure to manage risk striking down the freight powerful simply because the “through the ranks” freight executives did not master this essential slice of the management pie.

Vulnerabilities in this area fall into a number of categories, I will concentrate, as this is my area of experience, on the risk management required in respect of the security of air cargo.

It is known, and accepted, that aircraft are vulnerable to terrorist attacks, I need only mention the word Yemeni and everybody knows exactly what I am talking about.  ICAO introduced, many years ago, measures which have been refined and improved over the years, to minimise the dangers of terrorist attack on aircraft introduced through cargo.

The success of these measures is dependent on the co-operation of the components that make up the integrated process from consignor to aircraft.   Like it or not, if a freight, or courier agent, and to a lesser extent perhaps consignor, is not actively participating the risk management of air cargo, it displays a laissez faire attitude, inter alia, to the stakeholders of the enterprise.  Shareholders are protected by the layers of law that separate them from the business, not so directors.   Half-cocked risk management of air cargo could involve the directors in personal liability.

The freight forwarder, courier agent or air carrier, who choose not to participate in the legal requirements of air cargo risk management, being Annexure 17 of ICAO and Part 108, 109 and 110 of the SACAA regulations, are in the front line of the legal liability firing squad should an incident occur involving an explosive device. This vulnerability of does not derive solely from terrorist threats, dangerous goods are an equal part of the risk management that must be applied.   Incredible as it may seem, many forwarding agents, courier agents and air carriers are not aware of the legal requirement that even if you do not handle dangerous goods your staff require, by law, certain elements of dangerous goods training.  This does not mean one or two persons in the warehouse, it means everybody in the warehouse.   This example of ignorance in the industry is a tailor made illustration of the point that risk management is very low on the scale of perceived, or practised management responsibilities.

It is said by cynics that we live in a cold, harsh business world governed by the quest for money in which truth, honesty and integrity take a back seat.  In this environment, moral obligations that the freight industry owe to society is often blurred, or even lost.  The aircraft that carries your cargo also carries sisters, brothers, wives, sons, daughters, and friends who are dependent on your integrity, your skill and your application of the principles to protect these persons from injury and death.    If you do not do your job by disregarding your moral and legal responsibilities, you could have the deaths of many many people resting upon your conscience until you too meet with the end of this life that we all face.

Post by Rob Garbett Managing Director of Professional Aviation Services (Pty) Ltd. this article was previously published in FTW