Professional Aviation Services at Air Cargo Africa 2017

Airfreight into Africa is one of the largest growing markets in the world.

air-cargo-africa-2017Recognising this, the Air Cargo Africa conference and exhibition, which brings together various role players in the industry to explore the potential of this market, is coming to Emperors Palace, Johannesburg from the 21 -23 of February.

 


Professional Aviation Services, specialists in Aviation Security and Air Cargo Security Compliance and Training, will be exhibiting at Air Cargo Africa. With a 35-year history in Aviation, and specialising in providing unique solutions that solve client’s challenges, Professional Aviation Services is ideally placed to service and assist clients in finding solutions for their various needs.

We are passionate about keeping Aviation safe and secure, for ultimately, it is all about protecting people. From the personnel who are involved in the Aviation Industry, the people who fly as crew and passengers to the public who could be affected by an aviation incident. By taking part in Air Cargo Africa, we intend to showcase the importance of keeping the growing Airfreight in Africa business safe and secure.

With the airfreight industry into Africa growing at the rate that it is, now is the time to equip your organisation to take advantage of the growth, and keep your staff and your organisation safe and secure. Our services can be combined into a unique solution for you that is customised to solve your unique challenges.

We at Professional are always willing to take up a challenge. So, if you require a service or solution that is not listed below, contact us and let us see how we can help you.


 

Services that we offer include the following:

 

Consulting and Risk Services

  • EU RA3 Validations for clients who operate in countries that are not listed on the EU Green list
  • Air Cargo Security Compliance Consulting – with 36 Regulated Agents in South Africa as our clients, we have a wide range of experience in guiding clients in terms of operating a secure supply chain
  • Aviation Security Consulting – our team of experts can assist with your general aviation security queries and provide solutions for your challenges.
  • Risk Services – we can assist with security tests, audits and once-off checks to evaluate the security of facilities and processes.

Training Services

  • IATA Training Courses – through our registered IATA Authorised Training Centre, (ZA-PRI-1-14-001; ZA-PRI-3-16-001), we offer IATA Dangerous Goods training, Introduction to Safety Management Systems, as well as Aviation Security Awareness and Cargo Security Awareness courses, through the International Cargo Training Programme and the International Aviation Training Programme.11.01 - 4

 

  • Classroom Training – as a SACAA Approved Part 109 Aviation Security Training Organisation (Approval number: SACAA/AVSEC/CS/008 and SACAA Approved Part 92 Dangerous Goods Aviation Training Organisation, (Approval number: SACAA/DG/0031) we offer quality classroom based training at various locations around South Africa. Our main training centre is situated in Jet Park, with 4 dedicated classrooms, with other locations at Lanseria International Airport, and Wonderboom Airport. We are also able to conduct training in other parts of South Africa, with two dedicated branches in the coastal areas, one in Durban and one in Cape Town.

 Our training team consists of 7 SACAA Accredited Aviation Security Training Instructors, 2 of which specialise in Level 1, 2 and 3 Aviation and  Cargo Security Training. Several of our instructors are also qualified to teach Dangerous Goods Awareness.

 Courses on offer include:

  • Aviation Security Screener Training for Passenger and Baggage and for Cargo, Store, Mail and Supplies. (Level 1)
  • Aviation Security Supervisor Training for Passenger and Baggage and for Cargo, Store, Mail and Supplies. (Level 2)
  • Aviation Security Management Training for Airports and Airlines, as well as for Cargo. (Level 3)
  • General Aviation Security Awareness Training (ASAT)
  • Aviation Security Awareness (Cargo, Store, Mail and Supplies) Training
  • RPAS Aviation Security Awareness Training (for Drone/RPAS/UAV operators)
  • Dangerous Goods by Air Regulations (Awareness) for Categories: 4,5,7,8,9,10,11,12

  • Customised Courses – our dedicated Research and Development team specialise in developing customised in-house courses for clients, as well as to meet general training needs that we identify in the market.

Current courses that are available include:

  • Human Factors for Personnel
  • Human Factors for Supervisors and Managers
  • Lithium Battery Awareness (both classroom and on-line)
  • Handling of Lithium Batteries
  • Enhanced Security Training
  • Driver Security – Anti-Hijacking Course
  • On-line Learning – through our on-line learning platform, proftrain.co.za, we offer customised e-learning courses to various clients, as well as general courses that are open to the public.
  • Learner Management System – struggling to manage the training function of your organisation? The Professional Learner Management System is a database system which simplifies the management of training for your staff.

Other Services

  • dgr-58th-en-regular icao_techinical_emergency_response_guidebook_2013IATA Publications – as one of only two registered IATA Publications Agents in South Africa, contact us for all your IATA publication’s needs. We take the pain out of ordering IATA products. Visit protrain.co.za/shop to see all the products on offer.

 

  • ICAO Publications – are you looking for ICAO Annexes and Technical Instructions and other ICAO publications? We are a registered ICAO Publications Reseller, contact us to place your order today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Dangerous Goods and Lithium Battery Awareness Seminars – educating staff and clients is a vital part of doing business safely and reducing potential incidents. The Professional Dangerous Goods and Lithium Battery Awareness Seminars help to educate your clients about the dangers of mis-declared, undeclared or hidden dangerous goods. It also educates them on the dangers of Lithium Batteries and what is allowed and not allowed. Contact us to book a seminar for your staff or your clients.

lithium-seminar-3

lithium-seminar-17

lithium-seminar-97

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


For more details contact us on +27 11 397 1222, +27 11 701 3320 (24/7), email us at info@professional.za.com or visit our website, www.professional.za.com .

Drones: A South African security perspective

Drones, UAV’s, UAS, RPAS – whatever terminology that you may use, unmanned aerial vehicles are becoming more and more popular, not just for use by hobbyists who like to fly them on weekends, but for commercial purposes.

Using Drones for Commercial Use

 

Commercial use of drones ranges from aerial photography and filming, to being used in anti-poaching operations, aerial surveys, crop spraying, wildlife and other forms of monitoring, parcel delivery, delivering of medical supplies to remote areas, evaluation of fire scenes and incidents and surveillance.

Major retailers such as Amazon, are experimenting with drone technology for the fulfilment of orders in their larger warehouses, as well as looking at the viability of utilising drones to do deliveries. Large industrial plants are investigating the use of drones for spare parts logistics. Drones have been used to deliver blood and other essential medical supplies in hard-to-reach rural areas in countries like Rwanda.

Various organisations are testing using Drones to do deliveries.

Various organisations are testing the use of Drones to do deliveries.

Delivery options such as these, if they become a viable option for urban areas can increase the speed of deliveries, as well as saving resources and streamlining processes.

There are infinite applications, which are limited only by the technology that is currently available.

Negative uses of Drone Technology

 

Drone technology has many benefits when used in a positive manner. But like most technologies, there is a dark side to it as well. The most common “negative” use of drone technology that is prevalent, is the use of weaponised drones in warfare, as well as drones that have been used for espionage.

Criminals are also embracing drone technology. There have been reports of drones being used to smuggle items into prisons for the prisoners. In the UK, criminals have attached thermal imaging cameras onto drones in order to pick up the heat signatures of their rival’s marijuana farms, in order that they can steal from them. There are also what are known as “Narcotics drones”. These are drones that are used by drug dealers to smuggle drugs over the U.S./Mexican borders.

Closer to home, there is the potential for criminals to utilise drones to identify potential targets for robberies, both of commercial and private properties.

The word “Drone” has a negative connotation due to the use of weaponised drones that have been used in warfare by various countries, so the preferred name is the term RPAS – Remote Piloted Aircraft Systems. This definition encompasses the wide range of RPA systems that are available, from miniature units that can fit into the palm of your hand to larger fixed wing units with wingspans of more than 1m.

Risks involving RPAS

 

But with every technology, there is some element of risk that is involved. The military potential for destruction and the criminal element have already been highlighted, but the risks involving RPAS to the civilian user is just as high.

Injury to the Public

 

RPA’s can be very dangerous if not operated safely. Multi-rotor RPAS units have very sharp carbon fibre blades that can cause injury if they come into contact with a person. There has been a case in England where a toddler has lost an eye due to being injured by the blade of a RPA that was being flown in the backyard of the house.

Most RPA’s are powered by a rechargeable Lithium Polymer battery. As the recent Samsung Galaxy Note 7 incidents have illustrated, Lithium batteries can be very dangerous, if they are not manufactured or handled correctly. The Lithium Polymer batteries that are generally used in RPA’s are large and very powerful. If these batteries are not managed properly, they can be damaged and the damage to the battery can cause it to explode or ignite.

Besides the safety issues surrounding the RPA itself, other risks from the negligent operation of an RPA are the following:

Collision with other aircraft, with possible fatal results

 

There are frequent reports from around the world of pilots reporting RPA’s flying near their aircraft when coming into land. Besides the blatant disregard of the laws stating that RPA units should not fly within 10 km of an aerodrome, this is very dangerous. If the RPA had to strike the aircraft at a critical point while landing, and get caught up in an engine or wing flap, there could be disastrous consequences for the aircraft.

Other risks include damaging people’s property and legal liability for breaking laws such as privacy by-laws and other laws enforceable by other authorities.

Minimising the Risk

 

So, how can this be prevented? Firstly, by implementing specific legislation with regards to RPAS, and secondly by educating the public as to the risks and the rules regarding the use of RPAS.

South Africa is one of the first countries in the world that has introduced legislation with regards to the operation of Remote Piloted Aviation Systems (RPAS). With the rapid growth in the RPAS industry and the increased use of RPAS for commercial applications, legislation is necessary to ensure the safety and security of everyone who shares civil aviation airspace.

Part 101: Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems – the regulations that govern the operation of RPAS in South Africa became applicable in July 2015. These regulations cover the use of RPAS for commercial operations, corporate operations, non-profit operations and private operations.

Private Operations

 

With regards to operating RPAS in South Africa, if a person operates a RPAS unit for their own use, it may only be used for an individual’s personal and private purposes where there is no commercial outcome, interest or gain. The pilot must observe all statutory requirements relating to liability, privacy and any other laws enforceable by any other authorities. It is also a requirement that those that sell RPAS, display notices and inform buyers of the basic regulations as it applies to private and other uses of the systems that they sale

The flying of drones as a hobby has increased dramatically over the last number of years.

The flying of drones as a hobby has increased dramatically over the last number of years.

Commercial operations; corporate operations or non-profit operations

 

Drones or RPAS are often used for commercial filming e.g. movies, commercials.

Drones or RPAS are often used for commercial filming e.g. movies, commercials.

If an entity or a person is operating a RPAS for commercial operations; corporate operations or non-profit operations, the RPA must be registered and may only be operated in terms of Part 101 of the South African Civil Aviation Regulations.

 Aviation Security Awareness Training for RPAS 

 

Often the reason that individuals make mistakes or inadvertently break the rules, is that they are not aware of what the risks are or the potential threats. Therefore, one of the mandatory requirements is that all personnel employed in the deployment, handling, and storage of RPAS need to undergo Aviation Security Awareness Training, as detailed in Part 109 of the Civil Aviation Regulations.

Professional Aviation Services has been involved in the Aviation industry in one form or another for the last 35 years. We specialise in offering risk services in terms of compliance; aviation security consulting; training and aircraft sales.

We are passionate about educating and equipping people, and we are an approved Aviation Security Training Organisation. We offer the only SACAA approved Aviation Security Awareness training course designed specifically for RPAS operations. If you would like to find out more or book a training session, please contact us. Training is available at all our facilities. To find out more, please visit our training site, www.professionaltraining.co.za.

In Conclusion

In terms of mitigating risk and increasing security, education is key. The correct application of the regulations, the ongoing education of the public and the safe operation of RPAS, will go a long way in keeping the skies and people safe. This will create an environment where the use of RPAS technology to solve problems can become a reality.

Source information with regards to Part 101: South African Civil Aviation Authority.

Revised Regulations with regards to Aviation Security – what you need to know

UPDATE

The 14th Amendment to the Civil Aviation Regulations was published on the 28th October to be effective 30 days from date of publication, download the amendment here:

14th-amendment-to-the-civil-aviation-regulations-november-2016

The revisions to the Part 108, Part 109 and Part 110 Regulations and Technical Standards that have been in the works since 2012 passed the final benchmark on the 12th June 2015.

The Regulations will now go to the Minister for signature before becoming law and the Technical Standards will go to the Director of Civil Aviation for signature.


Here are some of the things that you need to know:

1. High Risk Cargo and the security measures relating to High Risk Cargo are clearly set out;

2. All Regulated Agents and Known Consignors to apply cyber security measures

3. Procedures for Transfer and Transit cargo set out;

4. Changes to Exempted Cargo, in particular that human remains are no longer exempt;

5. Regulated Agents no longer have to screen 10% of cargo from Known Consignors;

6. Known Consignors no longer function on the basis of a relationship with a Regulated Agent only, each Known Consignor now requires a Security Manual and is free to deal with any Regulated Agent;

7. Training for the personnel of Regulated Agents and Screeners is no longer under Part 108 all security training is now under Part 109;

8. Air Cargo Security Familiarisation Training as we knew it under Part 108 has been replaced by Aviation Security Awareness Training under Part 109 and the scope of people requiring training has been dramatically increased;

9. Screeners now require 10 days training plus 1 day X-Ray machine familiarisation training plus 10 days On The Job Training per screening method that they will use;

10. Screener Supervisors must be qualified Screeners before undergoing an additional 5 days of Supervisor training;

11. Security Managers, Designated Officials and Deputy Designated Officials require 5 days training.


 

These are some highlights, we are available if you need further details on any of the above and on the possible implications for your business.

The changes to Part 108 and security measures have long since been introduced into most security programs these should not cause any problems at all and should be welcomed as they are very good for cargo security.

Probably the most contentious issue from these Regulations will no doubt be the length of training for Screeners and Supervisors of Screeners. In the cargo world training required goes up dramatically.

We fully support these changes, remember that Screeners ensure your safety and the safety of all who fly, do you really want a poorly trained individual who has been given the minimum possible training screening the cargo under your seat?

We need to have world class training and certification, period. No debate, no if or buts, no excuses or debates about time and expense, this is a security issue not an economic debate.

Even the much vaunted TSA has challenges, they recently failed 97% of routine security tests.

We can do better.

Cargo Security Bulletin to Regulated Agents, Known Consignors, Airlines and Charter organisations

This bulletin takes the form of short highlights, PLEASE CONTACT us by e-mail if you require any FURTHER INFORMATION or EXPANSION of the information provided.

Where italics are shown this means a direct QUOTE FROM REGULATIONS, TECHNICAL STANDARDS or other CORRESPONDENCE received from the SACAA or other official bodies.

NEW PROFESSIONAL TRAINING CENTRE OPENS

We have OPENED our TRAINING CENTRE at Unit C, Wingfield Park, Geertsma Road in JET PARK (map at http://www.professionaltraining.co.za/map-to-our-training-facilities.php)

Regular scheduled TRAINING PROGRAMMES covering aviation cargo security familiarisation training take place every Tuesday and Dangerous Goods Awareness (CAT 4) every Wednesday.

The 2015 training schedule is at http://www.professionaltraining.co.za/2015-training-program.php

EUROPEAN UNION CARGO SECURITY REQUIREMENTS EFFECTIVE 1 JULY 2014.

South Africa was placed on the EU “Green List” effective 1st July 2014.

In our view, this change REDUCES the level of cargo SECURITY.

It is our STRONG ADVICE that those Regulated Agents who are REGISTERED under the EU Regulations and hold EU RA3 APPROVAL, continue to APPLY the practices applicable to the EU Regulations for two MAIN REASONS, firstly, INCREASED SECURITY and secondly, if there were an incident, and an EU accredited agent had not COMPLIED with the EU Regulations (having made a DECLARATION to do so) this could be considered a serious BREACH OF LIABILITY INSURANCE requirements.

Certain of our clients have elected to become EU REGISTERED, despite the fact that we are on the Green List, which we ENCOURAGE.

COMPREHENSIVE BACKGROUND CHECK AND CV VERIFICATION SERVICE (INCLUDING CREDIT CHECKS)

This service includes what is required under Part 110 but also provides the FULL RANGE of employee background checks including:

· DRIVERS LICENCE

· PUBLIC DRIVING PERMIT

· MATRIC CERTIFICATE AND OTHER ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS

· CRIMINAL RECORD CHECK

· ID VERIFICATION

· CITIZENSHIP AND PERMEANT RESIDENCE VERIFICATION

· PRIVATE SECURITY INDUSTRY REGULATORY AUTHORITY (PSIRA)

These services are available to be IMPLEMENTED at YOUR PREMISES, please contact us for full details

PART 109 AND 110

We report, once again, with DEEP REGRET, and fear of the security breach that this presents, that the SACAA have still NOT YET COMPLETED the amendments to PART 108, 109 AND 110. This has been raised at the Civil Aviation Regulations Committee (CARCom), on which committee we are represented through the Commercial Aviation Association of Southern Africa (CAASA), but despite pressure having been brought at CARCOM, by our representative, we still sit in LIMBO as far as these regulations are concerned.

There is a STRONG INDICATION that the Regulations may be READY for presentation at the 26TH JANUARY 2015 CARCom meeting.

We have mentioned on numerous occasions, in our bulletins and elsewhere, that the REQUIREMENTS UNDER PART 108 for cargo screeners are COMPLETELY INADEQUATE.

We cannot be more adamant when we say it is VITAL that although the requirements for certification of cargo screeners, and training, under Part 110, are NOT CURRENTLY APPLICABLE you NEVERTHELESS APPLY these requirements STRICTLY.

FREE CHECK OF YOUR SECURITY MANUALS

We repeat point 4 of Bulletin 33.

If your SECURITY MANUAL was not prepared by ourselves or under our supervision, we would be more than happy to provide you with a FREE CHECK and WRITTEN REPORT on your security manual. The fact that your manual may have been approved by the SACAA does not absolve you from ensuring that the manual is accurate, all inclusive and practical. Here again there may be INSURANCE LIABILITY implications if your MANUAL is INCOMPLETE.

FACILITATED eLEARNING TRAINING

Here again, we must state with GREAT DISAPPOINTMENT that there has been NO DISCERNIBLE PROGRESS by the SACAA to bring the eLearning system into operation. The changes to incorporate the eLearning requirements are to be contained in the Part 109 amendments (see 4 above).

SACAA SERVICE

We would like to COMPLIMENT the DIRECTOR FOR CIVIL AVIATION, MS POPPY KHOZA, for her INITIATIVE in initiating a survey of SACAA SERVICE PERFORMANCE. This survey was conducted by a team from the UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA and consisted not only of a questionnaire, which was e-mailed to various bodies, but also meetings with industry in Gauteng and Cape Town. WE ATTENDED the GAUTENG MEETING, together with REPRESENTATIVES of a number of AVIATION ORGANISATIONS, and were assured that comments, suggestions and criticism would be CONFIDENTIAL and would be CONTAINED IN A REPORT which will be released to participants. The meeting we attended lasted some hours and there was an open detailed and SIGNIFICANT DISCUSSION, particularly focused on those WEAKNESSES that had been experienced with regard to service from the SACAA.

We will keep you advised and will distribute the report with the authority of the SACAA.

LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES

We repeat what was contained in Bulletin 33.

There have been NUMEROUS INCIDENTS of SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION of lithium-ion batteries around the world and there are strong rumours that perhaps large quantities of lithium-ion batteries were TRANSPORTED ON MH370. Please find attached two articles that appeared in FTW written by SEAN REYNOLDS who is OUR AUTHORITY on LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES. We are running a number of half day LITHIUM-ION BATTERY COURSES over the next couple of months. Please contact us for further information.

Lithium Batteries                                                 lithium battery article

We are very pleased to say that these COURSES are now available ONLINE which means that your personnel can complete this course while continuing with their operational duties.

AVAILABILITY OF THE CARGO SCREENING TEAM INCLUDING EMERGENCY CANINE SCREENING

We are AVAILABLE 24/7 through our control room telephone number 0860 PART 108 or 011 701-3320, further alternatively, through our General Manager Compliance, David Alexander at david@prisk.co.za or cell 082 308 0169.

We are AVAILABLE 24/7 throughout the HOLIDAY PERIOD.

THANKS AND GREETINGS

WE TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY OF THANKING OUR CLIENTS FOR THEIR SUPPORT AND TO WISH ALL OF YOU GOD’S BLESSINGS FOR THE FESTIVE SEASON AND THE NEW YEAR.

Kind Regards from the team at Professional.

SECURITY WITHOUT COMPROMISE WILL SAVE LIVES.

Cargo Security Bulletin to Regulated Agents, Known Consignors and Charter organisations

This bulletin takes the form of short highlights, PLEASE CONTACT us by e-mail if you require any FURTHER INFORMATION or EXPANSION of the information given.

1 FAMILIARISATION TRAINING – GOOD NEWS !!

We have just completed an ELECTRONIC TRAINING COURSE which is now available. This means YOUR STAFF will be able to complete their FAMILIARISATION TRAINING ONLINE. We are also in the process of DEVELOPING ONLINE TRAINING covering DANGEROUS GOODS and OTHER COURSES which will be available from mid JANUARY 2013. LOANER LAPTOPS, in a limited quantity, are also AVAILABLE.

VISIT OUR TRAINING PORTAL TODAY!

2 New Regulations

Part 92, 108, 109, 110 and 111 Regulations came into full EFFECT from 1ST AUGUST 2012. Please note that the SACAA PROPOSED, which proposal was accepted by an industry / SACAA sub committee, that PART 110 AND 109 TECHNICAL STANDARDS SHOULD BE KEPT RESTRICTED.

Bob Garbett, who serves on the sub committee, and on CARcom, was ADAMANTLY AGAINST this proposal for all the OBVIOUS REASONS, however, certain members of industry and the SACAA SUPPORTED THE PROPOSAL. The proposal was then submitted to CARcom (the Civil Aviation Regulations Committee) at which it was PROPOSED that Part 108 TECHNICAL STANDARDS should also be RESTRICTED. This too was carried against OBJECTIONS from the COMMERCIAL AVIATION ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHERN AFRICA (on which body Bob Garbett is an honorary Director for Life). CAASA has NOT DROPPED THIS MATTER and APPEALED the decision by CARcom. Frankly, this is a RIDICULOUS SITUATION, which option we have voiced STRONGLY at CARcom, through CAASA, as any amendments, for example to these Technical Standards would also have to be applied for creating an unnecessary burden of administration for all.

In the meantime, if you do not have COPIES OF THESE TECHNICAL STANDARDS (and most Regulated Agents and airlines, ironically, all already have copies) you need to make APPLICATION to the CAA. We suggest (if you REQUIRE the TECHNICAL STANDARDS) that you address a LETTER to the SACAA requesting copies of the Part 110, 109 and 108 Technical Standards and SEND the letter to OURSELVES. WE will then APPROACH THE SACAA with batches of letters and ensure that authority for your holding a copy of the Technical Standards is obtained as soon as possible. The letter should STATE WHETHER or not you ALREADY HOLD a current set of these Technical Standards.

It was DIRECTED by CARcom at the 28th November meeting, as a result of the CAASA appeal, that this decision must be REVIEWED at the next sub committee meeting to be held in JANUARY.

3 Part 109 and Part 110

The SACAA have as yet still not completed the proposed AMENDMENTS to these Regulations which will incorporate all TRAINING including training required under Part 108 (currently regulated under Part 141) into Part 109. We hope this will be CONCLUDED by the SECOND QUARTER of NEXT YEAR. We are also advised that Aviation Information Circular AIC 18-49, which eliminates certain requirements for cargo screeners under Part 110, will be withdrawn. In the meantime, it is of MAJOR IMPORTANCE that cargo screeners COMPLY with the PROVISIONS of Part 110 which are LISTED BELOW (previously listed in Bulletin 24, April 2011, and Bulletin 19, May 2010).

a) SECURITY GRADING in terms of the Security Act no. 56 2001.

b) The security graded screener must be EMPLOYED BY A SECURITY SERVICE PROVIDER.

c) The screener must have at least DANGEROUS GOODS CAT 12.

d) The screener must have STANDARD AIR CARGO SECURITY TRAINING LEVEL 1.

e) Category 1: SECURITY SCREENER TRAINING

f) The screener must have completed AWARENESS TRAINING in terms of Part 109 (if he works at an airport) and or, if he works at an off airport Regulated Agent, FAMILIARISATION TRAINING in terms of Part 108.

g) The screener must have a CLASS II MEDICAL CERTIFICATE.

h) 40 HOURS CLASSROOM training, 40 HOURS PRACTICAL TRAINING.

i) COMPREHENSIVE BACKGROUND CHECK as set out in Part 110.

4 Designated officials, deputies and their employer to be registered with PSIRA.

Please find attached a LETTER from PSIRA dated 13th September 2012 addressed to the SACAA which was CIRCULATED by the SACAA recently. It is of SIGNIFICANT IMPORTANCE that you note that DESIGNATED OFFICIALS, their DEPUTIES and their EMPLOYERS (if you are employing persons in these positions) must be REGISTERED WITH PSIRA.

In our view, it MAKES SENSE from every point of view that INSTEAD OF EMPLOYING your own Designated Official and Deputy, these are PROVIDED BY A SERVICE PROVIDER.

5 Please refer to point 5 of Bulletin no. 29 of 20th June 2012 under “MEETING WITH DIRECTOR AND SENIOR STAFF OF AVSEC”. REPORT BACK

5.1 AIC 18-49, as mentioned above, will be WITHDRAWN.

5.2 Part 108, Part 109 Awareness Training has NOT IMPROVED.

5.3 GRADING OF DESIGNATED OFFICIALS, this has now been FINALISED, see above.

5.4 We stress that HAND SEARCH should be AVOIDED in all circumstances due to LIABILITY IMPLICATIONS.

5.5 The Part 110 and 109 AMENDMENTS have still NOT been COMPLETED.

5.6 KNOWN CONSIGNORS is still at an unacceptably LOW LEVEL.

5.7 MATURING has now been REMOVED as a security control.

Kind regards from the team at Professional Risk.

SECURITY WITHOUT COMPROMISE WILL SAVE LIVES.