Professional Aviation Services at Air Cargo Africa 2017

Airfreight into Africa is one of the largest growing markets in the world.

air-cargo-africa-2017Recognising this, the Air Cargo Africa conference and exhibition, which brings together various role players in the industry to explore the potential of this market, is coming to Emperors Palace, Johannesburg from the 21 -23 of February.

 


Professional Aviation Services, specialists in Aviation Security and Air Cargo Security Compliance and Training, will be exhibiting at Air Cargo Africa. With a 35-year history in Aviation, and specialising in providing unique solutions that solve client’s challenges, Professional Aviation Services is ideally placed to service and assist clients in finding solutions for their various needs.

We are passionate about keeping Aviation safe and secure, for ultimately, it is all about protecting people. From the personnel who are involved in the Aviation Industry, the people who fly as crew and passengers to the public who could be affected by an aviation incident. By taking part in Air Cargo Africa, we intend to showcase the importance of keeping the growing Airfreight in Africa business safe and secure.

With the airfreight industry into Africa growing at the rate that it is, now is the time to equip your organisation to take advantage of the growth, and keep your staff and your organisation safe and secure. Our services can be combined into a unique solution for you that is customised to solve your unique challenges.

We at Professional are always willing to take up a challenge. So, if you require a service or solution that is not listed below, contact us and let us see how we can help you.


 

Services that we offer include the following:

 

Consulting and Risk Services

  • EU RA3 Validations for clients who operate in countries that are not listed on the EU Green list
  • Air Cargo Security Compliance Consulting – with 36 Regulated Agents in South Africa as our clients, we have a wide range of experience in guiding clients in terms of operating a secure supply chain
  • Aviation Security Consulting – our team of experts can assist with your general aviation security queries and provide solutions for your challenges.
  • Risk Services – we can assist with security tests, audits and once-off checks to evaluate the security of facilities and processes.

Training Services

  • IATA Training Courses – through our registered IATA Authorised Training Centre, (ZA-PRI-1-14-001; ZA-PRI-3-16-001), we offer IATA Dangerous Goods training, Introduction to Safety Management Systems, as well as Aviation Security Awareness and Cargo Security Awareness courses, through the International Cargo Training Programme and the International Aviation Training Programme.11.01 - 4

 

  • Classroom Training – as a SACAA Approved Part 109 Aviation Security Training Organisation (Approval number: SACAA/AVSEC/CS/008 and SACAA Approved Part 92 Dangerous Goods Aviation Training Organisation, (Approval number: SACAA/DG/0031) we offer quality classroom based training at various locations around South Africa. Our main training centre is situated in Jet Park, with 4 dedicated classrooms, with other locations at Lanseria International Airport, and Wonderboom Airport. We are also able to conduct training in other parts of South Africa, with two dedicated branches in the coastal areas, one in Durban and one in Cape Town.

 Our training team consists of 7 SACAA Accredited Aviation Security Training Instructors, 2 of which specialise in Level 1, 2 and 3 Aviation and  Cargo Security Training. Several of our instructors are also qualified to teach Dangerous Goods Awareness.

 Courses on offer include:

  • Aviation Security Screener Training for Passenger and Baggage and for Cargo, Store, Mail and Supplies. (Level 1)
  • Aviation Security Supervisor Training for Passenger and Baggage and for Cargo, Store, Mail and Supplies. (Level 2)
  • Aviation Security Management Training for Airports and Airlines, as well as for Cargo. (Level 3)
  • General Aviation Security Awareness Training (ASAT)
  • Aviation Security Awareness (Cargo, Store, Mail and Supplies) Training
  • RPAS Aviation Security Awareness Training (for Drone/RPAS/UAV operators)
  • Dangerous Goods by Air Regulations (Awareness) for Categories: 4,5,7,8,9,10,11,12

  • Customised Courses – our dedicated Research and Development team specialise in developing customised in-house courses for clients, as well as to meet general training needs that we identify in the market.

Current courses that are available include:

  • Human Factors for Personnel
  • Human Factors for Supervisors and Managers
  • Lithium Battery Awareness (both classroom and on-line)
  • Handling of Lithium Batteries
  • Enhanced Security Training
  • Driver Security – Anti-Hijacking Course
  • On-line Learning – through our on-line learning platform, proftrain.co.za, we offer customised e-learning courses to various clients, as well as general courses that are open to the public.
  • Learner Management System – struggling to manage the training function of your organisation? The Professional Learner Management System is a database system which simplifies the management of training for your staff.

Other Services

  • dgr-58th-en-regular icao_techinical_emergency_response_guidebook_2013IATA Publications – as one of only two registered IATA Publications Agents in South Africa, contact us for all your IATA publication’s needs. We take the pain out of ordering IATA products. Visit protrain.co.za/shop to see all the products on offer.

 

  • ICAO Publications – are you looking for ICAO Annexes and Technical Instructions and other ICAO publications? We are a registered ICAO Publications Reseller, contact us to place your order today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Dangerous Goods and Lithium Battery Awareness Seminars – educating staff and clients is a vital part of doing business safely and reducing potential incidents. The Professional Dangerous Goods and Lithium Battery Awareness Seminars help to educate your clients about the dangers of mis-declared, undeclared or hidden dangerous goods. It also educates them on the dangers of Lithium Batteries and what is allowed and not allowed. Contact us to book a seminar for your staff or your clients.

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For more details contact us on +27 11 397 1222, +27 11 701 3320 (24/7), email us at info@professional.za.com or visit our website, www.professional.za.com .

Revised Regulations with regards to Aviation Security – what you need to know

UPDATE

The 14th Amendment to the Civil Aviation Regulations was published on the 28th October to be effective 30 days from date of publication, download the amendment here:

14th-amendment-to-the-civil-aviation-regulations-november-2016

The revisions to the Part 108, Part 109 and Part 110 Regulations and Technical Standards that have been in the works since 2012 passed the final benchmark on the 12th June 2015.

The Regulations will now go to the Minister for signature before becoming law and the Technical Standards will go to the Director of Civil Aviation for signature.


Here are some of the things that you need to know:

1. High Risk Cargo and the security measures relating to High Risk Cargo are clearly set out;

2. All Regulated Agents and Known Consignors to apply cyber security measures

3. Procedures for Transfer and Transit cargo set out;

4. Changes to Exempted Cargo, in particular that human remains are no longer exempt;

5. Regulated Agents no longer have to screen 10% of cargo from Known Consignors;

6. Known Consignors no longer function on the basis of a relationship with a Regulated Agent only, each Known Consignor now requires a Security Manual and is free to deal with any Regulated Agent;

7. Training for the personnel of Regulated Agents and Screeners is no longer under Part 108 all security training is now under Part 109;

8. Air Cargo Security Familiarisation Training as we knew it under Part 108 has been replaced by Aviation Security Awareness Training under Part 109 and the scope of people requiring training has been dramatically increased;

9. Screeners now require 10 days training plus 1 day X-Ray machine familiarisation training plus 10 days On The Job Training per screening method that they will use;

10. Screener Supervisors must be qualified Screeners before undergoing an additional 5 days of Supervisor training;

11. Security Managers, Designated Officials and Deputy Designated Officials require 5 days training.


 

These are some highlights, we are available if you need further details on any of the above and on the possible implications for your business.

The changes to Part 108 and security measures have long since been introduced into most security programs these should not cause any problems at all and should be welcomed as they are very good for cargo security.

Probably the most contentious issue from these Regulations will no doubt be the length of training for Screeners and Supervisors of Screeners. In the cargo world training required goes up dramatically.

We fully support these changes, remember that Screeners ensure your safety and the safety of all who fly, do you really want a poorly trained individual who has been given the minimum possible training screening the cargo under your seat?

We need to have world class training and certification, period. No debate, no if or buts, no excuses or debates about time and expense, this is a security issue not an economic debate.

Even the much vaunted TSA has challenges, they recently failed 97% of routine security tests.

We can do better.

The space between vigilance and paranoia

The security of air cargo has lagged behind stringent baggage and passenger security, a massive flaw in the armour of airline security.

80 % of air cargo worldwide lands up on passenger aircraft.

The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) has devised, in consultation with air carriers, forwarding and security organisations and governments, a system of checks, balances, procedures and requirements summarised together in Annexure 17 to the Chicago convention on International Civil Aviation (safeguarding International Civil Aviation against acts of unlawful interference) which is the mechanism devised to enhance air cargo security.

In South Africa the Regulations required to comply with ICAO Annexure 17 have been incorporated into the Civil Aviation Regulations of 1997 under Part 108 of the Regulations by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA).

The essence of the Regulations is that cargo from a known, and validated, source (consignors) passing through known and validated agents, and certified as such, may be accepted by air carriers as Known Cargo which then requires no further security, apart from random checks. If cargo does not qualify as Known Cargo delays, and the formidable risk of rejection of liability claims in the event of an incident, will be the consequence.

The SACAA Technical Standards, together with the Regulations, forms the foundation upon which the security procedures, measures and training may be formulated and introduced.

The technologies that have been implemented covering the carrying of weapons and other dangerous articles in passenger’s carry on baggage is meaningful and a forceful deterrent against the introduction of explosive and dangerous articles. However, this technology is questionable when applied to air cargo which consists of thousands of different shapes, sizes and differing materials often combining these materials.

It is indisputable that there is no single, technical or other practical, security control applied to air cargo that is infallible and that will not be able to be bypassed by a determined terrorist. ICAO have therefore devised this integrated system that involves all the segments of the supply conduit line from the consignor, or sender, through the hands of the forwarding or courier agent, the air carrier or handling agent, ramp handling agent and those responsible for loading the aircraft. In this way every entity becomes an active participant in air cargo security not only creating a secure conduit but also creating an audit trail which, in itself, is a tactic of deterrence.

Personnel employed at, and along, all stages of the conduit, must all undergo Air Cargo Security Familiarisation Training (and in certain specific cases formal training) as well as background checks including criminal checks. The premises of each of the control entities in the chain must be audited and made secure. Procedures set out in Air Cargo Security manuals, approved by the Civil Aviation Authority, dictate operational procedures.

Cargo having passed through the process becomes Known Cargo.

If Unknown Cargo is presented to a forwarding, courier agent or air carrier it must be made known by applying one, or more, of the security controls that are recommended in the Part 108 Technical Standards.

It is vital, and indeed a moral obligation that all parties involved in the movement of cargo must apply on-going vigilance and co-operation from consignor to aircraft.

Aviation safety is an absolute. It is not the quest for zero defect. It IS zero defect (with acknowledgement to Professor Johann Coetzee). This must be the standard that is applied at all times. Compromise or complacency must not be tolerated. The lives of innocent people could well depend on the quality of participation of all those that are involved in the movement of air cargo.

The Lockerbie disaster required an explosive device the size of a man’s fist to tragically affect the lives of hundreds of people. Binary explosives are the combination of two inert chemicals which, when combined even in small quantities, cause a powerful explosion using a low temperature detonator, these are unlikely to be detected by technical means.

It is almost a foregone conclusion that unless there is on-going and active stimulation of Part 108 measures, this potential complacency will set in. This will be balanced by the forwarding, or courier, agents having to appoint specifically trained Designated Officials who are responsible to the Civil Aviation Authority to ensure that the measures are implemented and are on-going. These Designated Officials are also responsible to ensure that the senders of cargo (consignors) implement and continue to apply the Part 108 security measures. The Civil Aviation Inspectorate, formed for this specific purpose, will also play a major role in the on-going vigilance required.

Liability insurance underwriters will certainly take a dim view of non compliance with these measures, which create a real possibility of claims being repudiated, and we should all be aware that claims involving passenger aircraft may well run to hundreds of millions of USD.

The silver lining is that these measures will increase general logistics security and help to deter fraud.

Article by Rob Garbett, Managing Director of Professional Aviation Services.