Essential IATA publications for 2018

IATA offers the air transport industry a comprehensive suite of products on a multitude of topics. Ranging from regulations and standards to guidance material, these publications are designed to promote safety and optimize efficient operations.

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Professional Aviation Services is an Authorised IATA Publications Reseller and source and supply a comprehensive range of IATA Publications on your behalf.

Best Performing Agents 2017

Highlights of our service to you include:

  • All publications are provided at IATA prices, you pay the same as you would if you sourced your publications directly from IATA;
  • We take care of all administration and payments, you get your publications delivered to your door, all you need to do is place the order and we do the rest;
  • We make sure that your order is fulfilled correctly and timeously, we deliver what you need when you need it;
  • We offer rebates of the cost of shipping, the rebate you qualify for will depend on the order placed;
  • Members of SAEPA and SAAFF qualify for expedited shipping and additional shipping cost rebates;

2018 IATA Publications Catalogue

Download the IATA Publications-Catalogue-2017

The 2018 IATA Publications Catalogue is now available. The catalogue provides information on all available IATA Publications. We suggest that you work through this comprehensive guide and select the publications that will add value to your operations.

One of the most used publications is the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations which is produced annually by IATA in consultation with ICAO, the Dangerous Goods Regulations are now available for 2018!

Dangerous Goods Regulations 59th Edition

DGR-59 Shipper Combo

The correct handling of Dangerous Goods is a critical part of the operations of all in the air cargo industry.

The IATA DGR is the industry-trusted source to help you prepare and document dangerous goods shipments for air transport. Used by the world’s airlines for over 60 years, the DGR is the most complete, up-to-date, and user-friendly reference in the industry.

Contact David Alexander on david@professional.aero to discuss your IATA publication needs for 2018.

Notice from the SACAA on the Samsung Galaxy Note 7

The SACAA has just issued a notice to the aviation and other related industries regarding the Samsung Galaxy Note 7.

The notice is attached for your information. sacaa-galaxy-note-notice-to-industry

The most important point to take note of is:

Air operators are required to comply with Special Provision A154 of the ICAO Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods which stipulate that “lithium batteries identified by the manufacturer as being defective for safety reasons; or that have been damaged; or that have the potential of producing a dangerous evolution of heat, fire or short circuit are forbidden for transport by air (e.g. those being returned to the manufacturer for safety reasons). The same provision can be found in the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations.

It is essential that all in the secure supply chain and air cargo industries stay up to date with developments that impact their business and the safety and security of the aviation industry.

The transport of lithium batteries by air is a complex subject that requires companies to stay up to date with all applicable regulations.

dgr-58th-editionThe best way to do this is to ensure that you have access to the latest IATA DGR and Lithium Battery Shipping Guidelines. These publications are now available in the 2017 edition.

Please contact David Alexander  if you need assistance or would like to order these critical IATA publications.

 

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IATA Publications: That time of the year……..

IATA Publications Sales Agent

It is “that time of the year” again, 73 days to Christmas and, 80 days until the 58th Edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations come into effect.

The 58th Edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations contain several very important changes and additions and it is essential that you and your organisation have the latest information in order to ensure that you are able to facilitate the safe transport of dangerous goods.

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Professional Aviation Services understand the dangerous goods environment; we will ensure that you remain fully compliant.

Professional are authorised IATA Publications Resellers and offer the full range of IATA publications, posters and electronic products, we guarantee the best prices, expedited shipping and discounts on bulk orders.

Contact David today on david@professional.za.com, Professional will guide you to ensure that you get full value for your dangerous goods compliance in IATA Publications for 2017.

Online ordering is coming soon at our online Training Academy at www.proftrain.co.za

IATA Publications Sales Agent

Looking for IATA publications? We are an authorised IATA Publications Reseller

We are an officially recognised IATA Publications Reseller.

If you are looking for any IATA publication, from the latest IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations, to Cargo codes; contact us today with your requirements.  Have a look at our PAS IATA Publications Catalogue 2016 and contact us in order to place your order.

IATA Publications Sales Agent

Charter operators, why risk ruin?

There is a practical and moral obligation upon all of us to do whatever needs to be done to keep the flying public, which of course includes our mothers, brothers, sisters, cousins and friends, safe from the terror and tragedy of an IED (improvised explosive device) or other cowardly act perpetrated by unhinged minds.

It is almost inconceivable that operators are not aware of cargo security requirements as set out in Annexure 17 of ICAO and Part 108 of our local regulations.

The idea is to establish a tight and secure security conduit, from consignor to aircraft, providing not only the physical security against acts of terror but also a recorded audit trail.

Alternatively (the case with charter flights) to make all cargo secure by proper screening methods.

For terror to succeed, it only takes apathy from the aviation industry

It is almost inconceivable that operators are not aware of cargo security requirements as set out in Annexure 17 of ICAO and Part 108 of our local regulations.

The idea is to establish a tight and secure security conduit, from consignor to aircraft, providing not only the physical security against acts of terror but also a recorded audit trail. Alternatively (the case with charter flights) to make all cargo secure by proper screening methods.

It is pertinent to remind operators of the definition of cargo in the regulations:

‘Cargo means any property carried on an aircraft other than mail, stores, unaccompanied or mishandled baggage’.

It should be well noted that private flights are also subject to these requirements.

Amendment 13 to ICAO Annexure 17 standard 4.6.4 (effective 15 July 2013), which insists that cargo must be confirmed and accounted for, by a Regulated Agent (in South Africa approved under Part 108) or an entity approved by an appropriate authority (SA CAA), emphasises requirements.

Complying with the Part 108 regulations is not a complicated process nor is it expensive

The threat of ruin by non-compliance is not idle speculation or unfounded rhetoric. The South African Part 108 regulations make it obligatory for Air Carriers, which include charter to make cargo known.

If there were a major incident (and perhaps we should do away with the niceties and simply say a crash involving loss of life) legal suits and legal investigation would erupt in all directions from the numerous entities that would be involved in such a situation.

It is my view, which I have reached, over the many years that I have been involved in air cargo security and the hundreds of conversations that I have had with local, international and other role players from airline personnel, regulators, insurance underwriters, lawyers (and I could go on).

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Rob Garbett

That if you, as an operator, have not complied with what is required under Annexure 17 of ICAO, as contained in Part 108 of our local regulations, your business, no matter what its size, could collapse under the weight of claims made against you.

The simple principle is that if you are aware of the terrorist threat and are informed of what has been prescribed internationally as preventative measures, and choose not to adopt these measures, you will be held liable.

The ‘corporate veil’ has reached such levels of transparency that personal liability by directors and senior personnel is also a very real nightmare.

Perhaps more important than the legal or material point of view, is the moral question.

If people are killed in an air crash in horrific circumstances, you may have helped to prevent such slaughter, how would you feel?

Dangerous Goods covered under Part 92 is another area deserving concern. The application of the principals and requirements for the carriage of dangerous goods is sadly lacking in the charter industry. Loss of life is, of course the overwhelmingly most important consideration but not to be lightly dismissed is that aircraft hull and liability insurance underwriters will repudiate claims caused by illegal carriage of dangerous goods (or for that matter unknown cargo) even if the dangerous goods did not cause the incident.

It is without any shadow of doubt your responsibility to ensure that you are aware of the implications, both from a legal and moral point of view, of non-compliance with both the Cargo Security and Dangerous Goods regulations.

Article by Rob Garbett, Honorary Director for Life of the Commercial Aviation Association of Southern Africa and Managing Director of Professional Aviation Services (Pty) Ltd.

Article previously published in the CAASA newsletter of May 2013

 

See the dinosaur eggs at AAD 2012!

When people discuss the origins of flight, they tend to concentrate on birds, on which man based the early studies that finally led to the first flying aeroplanes.

But it has been concluded by the scientific world that these feathered creatures, today represented by 9 900 living species, in turn evolved from small, specialised coelurosaurian theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic period (from about 196-to-45 million years ago). Among the features linking theropod dinosaurs to birds are the three-toed foot, a furcula (wishbone), air-filled bones, brooding of the eggs, and (in some cases) feathers.

And Professional Aviation Services have organised an exclusive display at the Africa Aerospace & Defence 2012 air show (September 19-23) to show this connection.

Part of this shows a clutch of fossilised dinosaur eggs laid by the herbivore dinosaur, Massospondylus carinatus, in the early Jurassic period, and found near the Golden Gate National Park in the North Eastern Free State. Two of these had been carefully opened by experts in Canada to show the fossilised skeletal remains of the dinosaur young.

To further emphasise the connection between dinosaurs and birds, Professional is also displaying an imprint of a small dinosaur clearly showing that it was feathered – presented to the University of the Witwatersrand by the Peoples Republic of China.

The MD of Professional Aviation, Bob Garbett, has borrowed the exhibits from the Bernard Price Institute for Palaeontlogical Research at Wits University – and, due to their priceless nature, the eggs will be displayed in a bullet-proof alarmed glass case under 24-hour guard.

After the display they will be exhibited as part of the Wits 90 Treasures Exhibition at Wits University.

This article appeared previously in the FTW.

Do you prefer the coalface?

The importance of risk management is, unfortunately, best understood only when disaster strikes.

Freight industry management executives were inevitably born, and raised, at the coalface of the business.  The art of management, including risk management, is more often than not learnt late in the career of a freight management executive.   The entrenchment of coalface experience, which often means fighting fires on a day to day basis rather than constructive forward planning, is difficult to shake off.   This mind set is encouraged by the attitude that “it will never happen to me”.

There are a number of examples of failure to manage risk striking down the freight powerful simply because the “through the ranks” freight executives did not master this essential slice of the management pie.

Vulnerabilities in this area fall into a number of categories, I will concentrate, as this is my area of experience, on the risk management required in respect of the security of air cargo.

It is known, and accepted, that aircraft are vulnerable to terrorist attacks, I need only mention the word Yemeni and everybody knows exactly what I am talking about.  ICAO introduced, many years ago, measures which have been refined and improved over the years, to minimise the dangers of terrorist attack on aircraft introduced through cargo.

The success of these measures is dependent on the co-operation of the components that make up the integrated process from consignor to aircraft.   Like it or not, if a freight, or courier agent, and to a lesser extent perhaps consignor, is not actively participating the risk management of air cargo, it displays a laissez faire attitude, inter alia, to the stakeholders of the enterprise.  Shareholders are protected by the layers of law that separate them from the business, not so directors.   Half-cocked risk management of air cargo could involve the directors in personal liability.

The freight forwarder, courier agent or air carrier, who choose not to participate in the legal requirements of air cargo risk management, being Annexure 17 of ICAO and Part 108, 109 and 110 of the SACAA regulations, are in the front line of the legal liability firing squad should an incident occur involving an explosive device. This vulnerability of does not derive solely from terrorist threats, dangerous goods are an equal part of the risk management that must be applied.   Incredible as it may seem, many forwarding agents, courier agents and air carriers are not aware of the legal requirement that even if you do not handle dangerous goods your staff require, by law, certain elements of dangerous goods training.  This does not mean one or two persons in the warehouse, it means everybody in the warehouse.   This example of ignorance in the industry is a tailor made illustration of the point that risk management is very low on the scale of perceived, or practised management responsibilities.

It is said by cynics that we live in a cold, harsh business world governed by the quest for money in which truth, honesty and integrity take a back seat.  In this environment, moral obligations that the freight industry owe to society is often blurred, or even lost.  The aircraft that carries your cargo also carries sisters, brothers, wives, sons, daughters, and friends who are dependent on your integrity, your skill and your application of the principles to protect these persons from injury and death.    If you do not do your job by disregarding your moral and legal responsibilities, you could have the deaths of many many people resting upon your conscience until you too meet with the end of this life that we all face.

Post by Rob Garbett Managing Director of Professional Aviation Services (Pty) Ltd. this article was previously published in FTW